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WASM offers the best in Mining Education

Jarrod Lucas

ABC GOLDFIELDS

NEW ARRIVALS: The WA School of Mines’ status as an international melting pot for mining education continues to grow, with students from across the globe flocking to regional Australia.

As WASM gears up for orientation week, ABC reporter Jarrod Lucas spoke with a group of post-graduate students about their first impressions of the Kalgoorlie campus.

The newcomers include Associate Professor Seongseung Kang from South Korea, Filipino Daryl Gaw and Dr Saeed Ghannadpour and PHD candidate Mohammadbagher Fathi, both from Iran.

Mr Gaw, who is studying a masters of philosophy focusing on metallurgical engineering, said the school has a strong international reputation.

“Basically the reason why I chose the Western Australian School of Mines is because I think it’s in the top 19 in terms of mining and metallurgical engineering around the world,” he said.

“They have the capability to equip me with the knowledge I need so when I go back to the Philippines I’ll be able to help my country develop their technology as well.”

Mr Fathi said moving from Iran to regional Australia has been a culture shock.

“I don’t have any experience like this … I am learning as I go,” he said.

WASM was initially set up in 1902 in Coolgardie, before the Kalgoorlie campus was established in 1903.

The school was administered by the Department of Mines until 1969 when it became a branch of the Western Australian Institute of Technology, which has since become Curtin University.

Prof Kang said he chose to study at WASM because of the ability to learn on the ground with such a diverse mining industry on the school’s doorstep.

“Australia is such a big country, and so many mineral resources,” he said.

“This time is my second time here. I’ve been very impressed by the mines.

“It’s a very good location to study about mining and things like rock stability.”

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