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Woodall Hall Agricola College WA School of Mines Curtin University Kalgoorlie

Curtin University has officially acknowledged the contribution and influence of mining great Dr Roy Woodall by naming a residential hall at Agricola in Kalgoorlie “Woodall Hall”.

The official acknowledgement took place on Tuesday night at a WA School of Mines Alumni (WASMA) and Women in Mining WA (WIMWA) sundowner held at the WA School of Mines Graduates Hall

Curtin University Pro Vice-Chancellor Science and Engineering, Professor Andris Stelbovics spoke at the event paying tribute to Dr Woodall, describing him as one of the most instrumental individuals in the Australian resource sector.

“It is indeed an honour to acknowledge Dr Roy Woodall’s outstanding commitment and distinguished service to the mining community of WA, in the Goldfields region and beyond,” Professor Stelbovics said.

“He is the holder of some of the most prestigious awards in his field and his scientific approach to exploration has contributed to major mining discoveries in the Goldfields and Australia wide, leading to the creation of jobs, wealth, development and investment around the nation.”

Traditionally, the halls of residence at Agricola College have been named after individuals linked to the Goldfields: O’Connor after C.Y. O’Connor, remembered for his persistence and drive to deliver transformative infrastructure projects, such as the Goldfields pipeline; Moore, after Bertie Moore who was a renowned metallurgist and mining engineer who became director of the Kalgoorlie School of Mines; and Hoover after Herbert Hoover the 31st U.S. President who worked in Kalgoorlie as a mine manager in the late 1800’s.

Continuing this tradition, it was agreed that the new $30m hall at Agricola College, officially opened in January this year, should be named “Woodall Hall”. This was in recognition of Dr Roy Woodall’s outstanding commitment and distinguished service to the mining community of WA, in the Goldfields region and beyond.

Dr Woodall was not able to attend the official opening but he attended the WASMA & WIMWA Sundowner August 8 where Andris Stelbovics acknowledged the naming of Woodall Hall.

Dr Roy Woodall AO (1930 – present) born in Perth, has provided distinguished service to the mining community of Western Australia. Woodall is revered as one of, if not the most instrumental individual in the Australian resource sector. Woodall has been a recipient to a catalogue of awards that have recognised his contributions not only to research, but also to the economic, social and environmental benefit of Australia

He is the holder of some of the most prestigious awards in his field, Legend of Mining Award, Inaugural National Geoscience Champion Award, and the Mawson Medal of the Australian Academy of Science to name a few.

Along with these awards and distinctions, Woodall has contributed to numerous advisory councils, committees and bodies over his career. These include the Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, the Geophysical Association of Australia, the Royal Society of Western Australia as well as being a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Technological Science.

His scientific approach to exploration has contributed to the mining discoveries in the Goldfields of WA and Australia wide including the Kambalda nickel field (1966), uranium at Yeelirrie (1971), the Olympic copper-gold-uranium deposits (1975), the St Ives gold field (1980), the East Spar oil-condensate field (1993) and contributed to many others. These discoveries have led to the creation of jobs, wealth, development and investment into these communities as well as Australia